sourdough brioche rolls (aka my brioche addiction part 3)

Okay, I admit I’m just fuelling my own brioche addiction with these recipes but these Sourdough Brioche Rolls really hit the spot. I’ve posted a few sourdough brioche recipes now but these ones are probably my favourite so far. I’m a sucker for easy breakfasts, and these sourdough brioche rolls are fluffy, sweet, and super easy to stick in the toaster, butter generously, and stuff in my face with relish of a wintry February morning. This recipe actually uses exactly the same dough recipe as my Sourdough Brioche Loaf recipe, but I’m going to show you how to make the simplest rolls out of it.

First things first…

We’re well used to what goes on in the Amongst The Flour kitchen by now, I’m sure you guys can tell me what we need to do first. You guessed it, we gotta feed our sourdough starters! I sadly had to throw out my starter a few days ago as she’d gone literally rancid (don’t ask me how I don’t know?) so we’re using a brand new baby this time around. As usual, I’ve fed my starter each day with a 1:1 ratio of rye and white flour, for the best results. For this recipe, this ratio of flour is just fine, but if you want a lighter, meltier, fluffier brioche, I suggest feeding with JUST white flour. You’ll need to keep tabs on the growth of your starter throughout the day, and use it at its peak as soon as it reaches.

Once you’ve got a beautifully bubbly and well risen sourdough starter, add that baby to a bowl along with the rest of the ingredients. As always, I use unsweetened oat milk (at room temperature) and extra virgin olive oil in this recipe. Of course you can use whatever you like, but these are just my preferred ingredients after lots of trial and error. We’re adding maple syrup into this dough, and like usual we’re using the A grade rich stuff (because everyone knows that’s best).

Whisk up all of those wet ingredients until they’re fully combined and then add in the flour a little at a time. I always use strong white bread/bakers flour for my breads but all-purpose flour works alright too. I simply find that bakery grade flours provide you with a nicer bread structure, AND a much lighter texture. Add the flour one cup at a time until you end up with a smooth and elastic dough that is not sticky. Add more or less flour as needed. You want your dough to be of low-ish hydration, but not dry and flaky (and this all depends on the humidity of your kitchen).

Once you’ve got a beautiful and tacky dough, knead her a few times before shaping into a ball, placing into a well-oiled bowl, covering with a DAMP tea towel, and leaving the ferment overnight. Always cover your dough with damp tea towel before proofing so that you don’t end up with a dried out and crispy layer on the top of your dough in the morning.

Stretch-and-fold…

About 1 hour after you’ve put the dough onto proof, you’re going to want to stretch-and-fold the dough. The stretch-and-fold process allows for extra gluten strands in your dough and makes the end result fluffier. To complete a stretch-and-fold, go ahead and take the top half of the dough and stretch it away from you. Fold the stretched out half of the dough over the rest of the dough. Turn the dough 90 degrees and repeat until you’ve gone all the way around. Then shape the dough back into a ball and place back into the bowl.

You’ll want to repeat this process 2-3 times more, leaving 30 minutes in between each iteration. After that, you’re free to re-cover the dough and let that baby rest for the night. In the morning, your dough should have risen to fill the bowl (or at least doubled in height). Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and complete one last stretch-and-fold before leaving to sit for 15 minutes (this is called the autolyse process and makes the dough much easier to handle later on).

After 15 minutes, cut the dough into 12 roughly even pieces. We’re now going to shape each of these pieces into a roll. Take one piece of dough and gently cup your hands on the far side of the dough. Pull it towards you into a scooping motion before turning 180 degrees and repeating the process until you’ve got a perfectly round little roll. Place the roll onto a lined baking sheet, and repeat this process for the rest of the pieces. Cover the rolls with a damp tea towel and let prove for 1-2 hours, until they’ve increased in size by 50% and are nice and puffy.

Towards the end of the 1-2 hour proof, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Lightly brush the rolls with a little melted dairy-free butter or plant milk, and bake in the oven for 30 minutes until golden brown on the top. Once cooked, remove from the oven and leave to cool for at least 20 minutes before slicing in half and serving. I LOVE to enjoy these sourdough brioche rolls smothered in dairy-free butter and drizzled with honey (and a sprinkle of salt if I’m feeling it). Once completely cooled, you can store these rolls in an airtight bag in the freezer and simply defrost and toast when you want them.

And it’s really as simple as that. Super easy Sourdough Brioche Rolls, perfect for breakfast or just whenever. I really hope you love these brioche recipes as much as I do (should I continue the series?). If you make this recipe, make sure you leave a like and a comment down below! I absolutely love hearing from you guys and you can be sure that I will try my best to get back to you soon! And of course, if you do make this recipe, don’t forget to tag me on Instagram @amongsttheflour I love seeing the photos of recipes you’ve all made! Have a warm and cozy winter, and stay safe and healthy this February! I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Katherine x

MORE SOURDOUGH RECIPES:

Super Simple Sourdough Brioche Loaf

Ingredients

  • 110g (1/2 cup) bubbly, sourdough starter
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) unsweetened plant milk
  • 65ml (1/4 cup) olive oil
  • 2-3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 450g (3 cups) strong white bread flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Method

In the morning

  1. Take your sourdough starter out of the fridge and give it a good feed. For this recipe you’ll want your starter to be about the same thickness as pancake batter.
  2. Leave the starter to come to room temperature and double in height throughout the day. By about mid-late afternoon, your starter should be ready to use.

In the afternoon

  1. Once the starter is nice and bubbly and at least double the height it was originally, pour the stated amount into a large mixing bowl. Add in the milk, oil, syrup, and vanilla, and whisk everything together until combined.
  2. Add in the salt and the flour one cup at a time, until everything is combined. You’ll want to use your hands as you add the last of the flour to make sure it’s fully incorporated. Knead gently in the bowl for a few minutes until smooth and fairly elastic.
  3. Shape the dough into a ball and cover with a damp tea towel. Leave to prove for 8-12 hours overnight. During the fermenting process, complete 2-3 stretch and folds to create long gluten strands in the dough. Complete the first stretch-and-fold after 1 hour, and then the other 1-2 every 30 minutes afterwards.

The next morning

  1. In the morning, your dough should have risen to fill the bowl, or at least doubled in height. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and complete one last stretch-and-fold before leaving to sit for 15 minutes (this is called the autolyse process and makes the dough easier to handle later on).
  2. After 15 minutes, cut the dough into 12 roughly even pieces. We’re now going to shape each of these pieces into a roll. Take one piece of dough and gently cup your hands on the far side of the dough. Pull it towards you into a scooping motion before turning 180 degrees and repeating the process until you’ve got a perfectly round little roll.
  3. Place the roll onto a lined baking sheet, and repeat this process for the rest of the pieces. Cover the rolls with a damp tea towel and let prove for 1-2 hours, until they’ve increased in size by 50% and are nice and puffy.
  4. Towards the end of the 1-2 hour proof, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Lightly brush the rolls with a little melted dairy-free butter or plant milk, and bake in the oven for 30 minutes until golden brown on the top.
  5. Once cooked, remove from the oven and leave to cool for at least 20 minutes before slicing in half and serving. I LOVE to enjoy these sourdough brioche rolls smothered in dairy-free butter and drizzled with honey (and a sprinkle of salt if I’m feeling it). Once completely cooled, you can store these rolls in an airtight bag in the freezer and simply defrost and toast when you want them.

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